I was approuched by an interior design company that was looking for an interior photographer in London to document their work and had chosen three photographers they were interested in, when working as an interior photographer I sometimes get asked to shoot a set of trial images for a client in order to win a contract this was one of those times.  The following images are from one of these shoots, I unfortunately did not get the contract so these images will not be used but I really liked the shots so thought I would show people:

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image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)

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image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)

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image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)

Thanks for looking

For more examples of my interior photography please check out my site:

www.nicholas-adams.co.uk

The perspective control stitch is a technique that is used mainly in interior and architectural photography but sometimes for landscapes. With the majority of my work as an interior photographer being in confined spaces its often tricky to fit the whole room or the space you want to within the camera frame without using an ultra wide lens which causes massive distortion. So the ability to shift the lens up and down or side to side means that you can fit more into the frame, however the only downside is the image sizes tend to not be traditional sizes.

I am going to explain how I get from these three images:

ato this

Untitled_Panorama1-Recovered

So the first thing is the initial taking of the images which requires a PC-E lens I use the 24mm PC-E Nikkor lens when mounted on a camera it is possible to shift the lens up and down in order to move the frame of the image:

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This results in images which all line up perfectly as the perspective has not changed and the lens has shifted along a single plane.

Next the images all need to be imported into Lightroom or an equivalent raw editor and an initial edit done to a single image,

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these changes are then copied and pasted to the other images to keep consistency:

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Once this is done all images should look the same exposure and color wise. The images should then be exported into a folder.

Once this is done open Photoshop where you need to do an automated photomerge which can be found here:

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A box will open and make sure that you select the three images you exported from Lightroom, then make sure that the “blend images together”, “remove vignetting” and Geometric Distortion Correction” are all selected:

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Once this is done click “OK” and this will start the process, once this is done you will need to flatten the image as it will now be made up of various layers:

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Once the image is flattened you will have to crop some of the image in to remove the areas around the outside, the next step is to adjust the image to make sure that all the lines are straight. To do this you can either use the lens correction option in the “Filter” menu however I prefer to do this manually by selecting the whole image:

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Then you need to select free transform which can either be done by holding command and pressing T or it can be found in the menu:

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To make more accurate adjustments you may want to have a grid layover which will help you to make sure all the lines are straight, this can be done by holding “command ” and the ” ’  ” or it can be found in the menu here:

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Once you have completed your adjustments you should be left with an image which should look like a cleanly blended panoramic stitch.

Then its up to you as to how you edit your image, what you remove and your final post production, here is my final image alongside the pano stitch:

Untitled_Panorama1-Recovered copy

Thanks for reading, for more examples of my interior photography check my website:

www.nicholas-adams.co.uk

A photographic assistant is a person who has many roles when working alongside a photographer this can vary from carrying equipment to doing post production on images it all depends on what is agreed between the photographer and the assistant before hand and what level of assisting is required. A photographic assistant is a job in its own right and should be treated as such, it is not always simply an internship to learn from the photographer although many times this is what it is there are also people who see assisting as a career and choose to assist instead of actually becoming a practicing photographer themselves. Having the right assistant on a shoot can make or break a shoot. There are various things you should consider before choosing someone to assist for you and also various rules I believe assistants should try to follow when assisting. In this blog post I hope to cover many points using my experiences and from what I have learnt speaking to other photographers.

Many photographers choose not to use an assistant this may be due to many reasons but the most common reason is that they just “have never used them”. Many people see it as an unnecessary cost which reduces overall profit however there are also many benefits to having an assistant which include:

Carrying equipment

This depends on the type of photography you do, if you are a photojournalist then often you will only carry two camera bodies with lenses attatched and would have no need for an assistant to carry your equipment. However an interior and architectural photographer like myself carries a huge array of different equipment from large Peli cases full of lenses and camera bodies to lighting and even cases containing props. All of this equipment needs to initially be bought into the location and then often dismantled and reassembled in various locations around a building. Although this could be done alone having an assistant with you saves time and allows you those precious minutes to consider the next shot or speak to the client. Also the last thing a client wants to do is speak to a photographer when he is out of breath and sweating. Also on a more selfish note a photographer needs to ensure that they stay healthy and avoid injury as I learnt recently when I slipped a disk in my upper back.

Setting up a shoot

Setting up a photo shoot takes time whether it be a studio with backdrops, lighting and even laptops and computers which need to be tethered to the camera. Testing equipment also takes time, making sure that pocketwizard triggers the right light and the camera is sending images. All of this is time that could be spent talking to the client, models or hair and makeup to ensure that they are informed about the shoot. Having an assistant or even a team of assistants frees up the photographer to concentrate on the actual shoot itself as apposed to the tools being used for the shoot and this will result in better images in the long run because the photographer wont feel rushed.  With interior photography which is what I do the space we are photographing is often lived in and needs a lot of attention before I can even consider photographing it. An assistant is an essential part of my shoots because they help to tidy a location and set it up for the shot (often an item of furniture will look completely wrong in real life but through the camera its perspective is perfect). Also the assistant can act as a second set of eyes for small details such as a light switch on the wrong setting or even a reflection where you or the camera is visible (happens more often than I would like).

Appearances

In the world of professional photography appearance is everything. A scruffy photographer is likely to not get repeat work especially when working with high end or luxury clients as they want the people providing the photography to reflect their product. This should also be said for your assistant who should always be smart. Having an assistant gives off the appearance of being more professional and having the available funds to pay an assistant which is often important because clients want the assurance that they are hiring the “best”. This doesn’t mean you have to wear an Armani suit and tie but try to dress smart casual.

Driving

Many photographers specify that their assistant be over 26 and hold a driving license this is because they wish to insure that assistant to drive their car to jobs and its cheaper to do so if they are over 26. The reason for this is to make sure that the photographer arrives at a job fresh and ready to work as often jobs will be a long distance away. This is similar in reason to why people use business class on aeroplanes because driving/ travelling is tiring.

Helping with directing and controlling light

This is one of the most important uses of an assistant. Controlling light is exactly what a photographer does as images are created using light. An assistant holding a reflector or blocking stray light beams or reflections is essential for any shoot on location or in a studio.

My assistant blocking out a reflectionMy assistant blocking out a reflection

Choosing an assistant

The way you choose who assists you is a personal thing as there is a huge aspect of trust between the photographer and the assistant which needs to be strong as essentially the assistant becomes an extension of the photographer when working on a job.

Here is a list of things I believe you should consider before hiring a photographic assistant:

1 - Their connection to photography

If someone has decided that they want to be a photographer but dont know where to start so see assisting as a route into becoming a photographer this is a good start and will mean that the person is enthusiastic but can also mean that the person is inexperienced and will need a lot more training which takes time and is best avoided “on location” in front of clients, there is nothing more unprofessional than having to explain how a light works to your assistant while the client stands there impatiently waiting for their portrait. So if you hire someone who is not skilled in the photographic equipment its usually a good idea to get them in and show them around your equipment or take them on a job where the client is not present.

2 – Their age

Age is not an essential factor when choosing an assistant but with age comes a sense of responsibility as well as common sense. Many things could also be affected by the age of your assistant such as liability insurance and also car insurance should you wish your assistant to drive.

3 – Appearance

An assistants appearance should reflect the photographers appearance so if you are photographing luxury properties an assistant wearing baggy jeans and covered in tattoos and piercings will probably not go down too well. However if photographing an album cover for a heavy metal band then a suit would look out of place. Assistants should try to dress smartly as if going to work in any job but make sure that its comfortable and your shoes are sensible. Also take into account the weather. If in doubt ask the photographer you are assisting, another must is the clothes should be dark and non reflective as the last thing a client wants to see in their windows is a reflection of the assistant.

4 Always meet the assistants

Always make sure you meet the assistant you are wanting to use before taking them on a job, this is essential because you never know who could turn up and also its important to get to know them

What can you do as a photographer to help the assistant?

1 - Be clear on instructions

When asking an assistant to do something always be clear and concise, always let them know exactly what to do and encourage questions if they are unsure.

2 - Pack properly

Try to pack equipment so that it is easy to carry, keep lighting stands in a bag not just loose in the boot of the car to avoid the assistant walking down the road balancing everything on their head.

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3 - Label your lenses

This is a good way to ensure the assistant will grab the correct lens, just put a small label on the lens cap:

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And now a list of things that Assistants should NEVER do while on a shoot

1 – EAT ON A SHOOT

Never eat while working unless instructed to by the photographer, snacking is not professional

2 –Never chew chewing gum

Chewing chewing gum is both rude and noisy often on a shoot its very quiet and the sound of an assistant chewing is off putting.

3 -  Never swear

Swearing is both rude in most situations but in front of a client is a big no no

4 – Never pitch your own photography

This sounds like an obvious thing to say but it does happen. Pitching your services to another photographers client is both rude and to do it while assisting is stepping over a barrier of professionalism.

5 – Being on your phone

Nowadays everyone has a mobile phone but in most jobs you are not allowed to use while working and this should be the same while working for a photographer. There is nothing worse than turning around and finding your assistant texting their friend or updating their facebook.

6 – Taking your own photos

Unless stated by the photographer keep your camera at home as well as keeping your camera phone in your pocket. Many shoots are not supposed to be seen by the public until the images are complete so an assistant posting images online may jeopardise this and get the photographer in trouble with the client.

6- Never turn up late

If you are going to be late at least let the photographer know but if possible try to be on time or early as often the photo shoot has a restricted amount of time for completion and your lateness can ruin a shoot.

So in conclusion picking an assistant takes time and you often work your way through a few before finding one you are happy to use.

Thanks for reading and leave a comment if you have suggestions

Nick

www.nicholas-adams.co.uk

Being an interior photographer equipment is important especially when photographing interiors where I need the lighting to look natural throughout the image. The spaces I work in vary greatly but everytime I look to achieve a style of lighting which is even and of a high standard. Getting an even spread of light is important to ensure the image looks clean and well diffused light means that the shadows will be softer ensuring detail in the shadows. There are many different options out there when choosing how to light a space but I have chosen to do this using a completely portable and easy to transport option which I am going to outline below; I use three of these set ups to light spaces and pretty much anything I photograph as they are very versatile light set ups.

Being a Nikon photographer I have opted to use the Nikon SB-700 speedlight which is very easy to use both as a main TTL flash and as an off camera flash. The Nikon flash system can be triggered using the on camera flash on the D800 however I have found that this is unreliable and has limited range especially when hiding flashes around corners or even outside a location. I decided that instead of using the in built commander mode I would  invest in some flash triggers and receivers by Yongnuo which enable me to trigger the speedlight wirelessly, these Yongnuo R-602 triggers are simple but well made despite their low price and being low cost means I am able to purchase a second set as a backup just in case one breaks if not even a third set and still save money compared to triggers such as pocketwizards which essentially do the same thing at ten times the price:

yongnuo-rf-602-featureYongnuo RF-620 trigger

I then used a specialist bracket which allows the speedlight to be mounted onto a studio stand, these brackets are easy to find on ebay and again are low cost so you can buy a few backups, with a bit of searching you can get them for around £4, the bracket also has a hole for inserting an umbrella so you can use various reflectors and diffusers:

228646437Speedlight bracket with umbrella holder

The next choice was what diffuser to use, I wanted something that spread the light evenly and was very portable so I opted for an umbrella softbox, this can be collapsed down and transported easily but creates a very even light spread as well as diffusing the light so that there is detail in all the shadows and they are not too harsh. There are two different types of umbrella softbox the one that uses a reflective surface to bounce the light back through a diffused rear however the light through these is very directional and does not spread evenly. I opted for a softbox where the umbrella section is the diffused area as this allows light to flow in every direction and is even and soft.

Umbrella Softbox on location mounted to studio stand

I hope this helps people to build a cost effective portable lighting set up for any type of photography

Nick

Having previously worked for Parmigiani Fleurier  photographing their boutique they got in touch asking if I could photograph a private dining room they had designed and installed at the famous and very exclusive Mosimann Restaurant in London. Parmigiani were after a set of Interior Photographs that conveyed the feeling of both Mosimann and Parmigiani as a brand; luxurious, personal and exclusivity were some of the feelings I get from looking at these brands, so with this in mind I set out to photograph the interior and here is the resulting images:

Mosimann_Parmigiani01Mosimann_Parmigiani16Mosimann_Parmigiani18Mosimann_Parmigiani19Mosimann_Parmigiani13Mosimann_Parmigiani15Mosimann_Parmigiani20Mosimann_Parmigiani22

image is copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)

I was contacted by London Basement who were after an Interior Photographer in London who could photograph some of their amazing basement projects. I met with them and they explained that they were looking for someone with a good eye for details who could dress a property so that it looked right in the images. Having begun my career in interior photography working with visual merchandisers within the retail sector I have a very good knowledge base on how to dress a space for aesthetic purposes. With the help of Anna my assistant we were able to document the spaces in a way that both complements the architecture and the design with an emphasis on the attention to detail that London Basement are known for. The first property was a more traditional design with an emphasis on family and practicality whereas the second had a more modern feel to it with an emphasis on wide open space. Both properties however made good use of the available natural light which was channelled down into the basement using light wells which makes the spaces feel as though they are on the ground floor as aposed to under the ground this is a nice change from the usual basement which tends to feel enclosed and almost claustrophobic. The choice in paint color also helped to make the spaces feel light and airy adding to the almost illusion that you are not in a basement.  I am very much looking forward to possibly working with London Basements in the future on projects, here are some images from both properties:

Property 1:

113HampsteadWay04113HampsteadWay07113HampsteadWay13113HampsteadWay01113HampsteadWay11113HampsteadWay09113HampsteadWay17

Property 2:

47Northway0447Northway0747Northway0847Northway1147Northway0947Northway18

All images are copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk) and should not be used without prior consent

Continuing with the hard drive organisation and found some more images I thought I would give a quick re-edit and post them up:

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Image Copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.Nicholas-Adams.co.uk)

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Image Copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.Nicholas-Adams.co.uk)_AAA9401

Image Copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.Nicholas-Adams.co.uk)

Sometimes as an interior Photographer I get asked to photograph luxury high end properties in London. One of my clients Rundell Associates asked me to photograph this property a while back, I was going through my harddrive and found this image and immediately decided to do a re-edit as in my opinion its one of the finest examples of interior design, lighting design and construction of a bedroom or even any room I have ever come across:

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Image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.Nicholas-adams.co.uk)

For more examples of my work check my website:

www.Nicholas-adams.co.uk

I was commissioned by two interior designers who work under the guise of the name FrozenFrogs. They contacted me asking if I would be interested in photographing a project they had undertaken designing and building an extended area on the rear of a famous Inn called the Royal Inn on the Park in Hackney. I of course said yes being an interior photographer I get asked to photograph many different types of projects but I have to admit this was my first Inn.

However I approached the project in the same way as I would any project by taking a walk around the space in order to get a “feel” for it. I decided that the space needed to be shown set up as though customers could walk in and dine/ drink there immediately. With the help of my assistant Anna we set about removing furniture to make it look more spacious as due to the Inn being in use it had been set up for practicality rather than aesthetics. Once set up we set about photographing the space but soon discovered that the sunlight was too bright so realised that I would have to blend various exposures in order to achieve an evenly exposed image throughout.

I asked the interior Designers to give me a few words about the design and thought process behind it here is their words:

"I am happy everybody involved in the design process like the end product. Anyone can criticise the style, the colour scheme, the furniture, but at the end of the day the practicality is there and I believe that’s what makes this kind of project successful. The new volume works well with the original building and the sliding doors opening onto the terrace make the space magical."

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Royal Inn on the Park, Image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)

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Royal Inn on the Park, Image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)

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Royal Inn on the Park, Image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)

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Royal Inn on the Park, Image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)

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Royal Inn on the Park, Image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)

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Royal Inn on the Park, Image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)

For more examples of my work check my website:

www.nicholas-adams.co.uk

I was contacted by the Luxury watch makers Parmigiani Fleurier who were looking for an Interior and Architectural Photographer in London and found my work. They liked my style and asked if I could photograph their brand new Boutique in the Mayfair area of London. The Boutique was designed by the very talented Thierry Conquet who has worked for the brand for 12 years. The Boutique is located on Mount street in London and is designed in a way that makes the space both luxurious and functional as a boutique. The attention to detail is incredible from the integration of hidden cabinets to hold brochures and the carefully designed hand rail on the staircase all made to fit with the theme of the Luxury watch brand.

I was pretty much given free reign with this project to interpret the space how I wanted with the exception of a few key features and details. I wanted to ensure that the images were incredibly clean and exposed correctly throughout showing all the details that have gone into creating this space. I used the Nikon D800, due to its incredible high resolution (the highest of any production professional DSLR camera at the moment) which is perfect for architectural and interior photography and due to its latitude I was able to retain detail throughout both the highlights and the shadows in even the most challenging of lighting situations. When approaching a space that is rather confined which this boutique is its important to avoid using wide angle lenses which can lead to distortion and a gross misrepresentation of the space, I made sure that where possible distortion was not present in the photographs and all lines were straight this is where the 24mm PC-E lens comes into its own, allowing wide angle with no distortion of lines.

Here are a selection of images from the two days spent documenting this incredible luxury boutique:

Interior Photograph of Parmigiani Boutique in LondonInterior Photograph of Parmigiani Boutique in London by Nicholas Adams

 Image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)

Interior Photography of Parmigiani Boutique in London by Nicholas Adamswww.nicholas-adams.co.ukInterior Photography of Parmigiani Boutique in London by Nicholas Adams
www.nicholas-adams.co.uk

 Image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)

PLEASE CLICK BELOW FOR MORE IMAGES:

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 Image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)Parmigiani_London012

 Image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)Parmigiani_London015

 Image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)Parmigiani_London029

 Image copyright property of Nicholas Adams (www.nicholas-adams.co.uk)

Thank you for looking and for more information about myself or for enquiries please visit my website

Nicholas

As an Interior photographer I often get some interesting projects to photograph. I was approuched by an architectural company called Moreno Masey who were looking for an Interior photographer in London who could document the refirbishments they had been doing for Nandos. Nandos is a very popular restaurant but has been in need of an aesthetic update for a while. The majority of photographs were shot using the Nikon 24mm PC-E and the D800.

All Photographs are copyright property of Nicholas Adams 

For more of my work please take a look at:

www.Nicholas-Adams.co.uk As an Interior photographer I often get some interesting projects to photograph. I was approuched by an architectural company called Moreno Masey who were looking for an Interior photographer in London who could document the refirbishments they had been doing for Nandos. Nandos is a very popular restaurant but has been in need of an aesthetic update for a while. The majority of photographs were shot using the Nikon 24mm PC-E and the D800.

All Photographs are copyright property of Nicholas Adams 

For more of my work please take a look at:

www.Nicholas-Adams.co.uk As an Interior photographer I often get some interesting projects to photograph. I was approuched by an architectural company called Moreno Masey who were looking for an Interior photographer in London who could document the refirbishments they had been doing for Nandos. Nandos is a very popular restaurant but has been in need of an aesthetic update for a while. The majority of photographs were shot using the Nikon 24mm PC-E and the D800.

All Photographs are copyright property of Nicholas Adams 

For more of my work please take a look at:

www.Nicholas-Adams.co.uk As an Interior photographer I often get some interesting projects to photograph. I was approuched by an architectural company called Moreno Masey who were looking for an Interior photographer in London who could document the refirbishments they had been doing for Nandos. Nandos is a very popular restaurant but has been in need of an aesthetic update for a while. The majority of photographs were shot using the Nikon 24mm PC-E and the D800.

All Photographs are copyright property of Nicholas Adams 

For more of my work please take a look at:

www.Nicholas-Adams.co.uk

As an Interior photographer I often get some interesting projects to photograph. I was approuched by an architectural company called Moreno Masey who were looking for an Interior photographer in London who could document the refirbishments they had been doing for Nandos. Nandos is a very popular restaurant but has been in need of an aesthetic update for a while. The majority of photographs were shot using the Nikon 24mm PC-E and the D800.


All Photographs are copyright property of Nicholas Adams 


For more of my work please take a look at:


www.Nicholas-Adams.co.uk

A family in Mumbai Slums who welcomed me into their home….


An amazing family that invited me into their home while I was in Dharavi in Mumbai. I ate food with them and laughed with them. They had a son who I believe suffered from aspergers syndrome however despite this he was not treated in any different way which was inspiring to see in a community where everyday is hard work.

I cant decide between colour and black and white so here are both drop me a comment and let me know which one you like:



For more examples of my documentary work and other work feel free to check out my website:

www.nicholas-adams.co.uk  A family in Mumbai Slums who welcomed me into their home….


An amazing family that invited me into their home while I was in Dharavi in Mumbai. I ate food with them and laughed with them. They had a son who I believe suffered from aspergers syndrome however despite this he was not treated in any different way which was inspiring to see in a community where everyday is hard work.

I cant decide between colour and black and white so here are both drop me a comment and let me know which one you like:



For more examples of my documentary work and other work feel free to check out my website:

www.nicholas-adams.co.uk 

A family in Mumbai Slums who welcomed me into their home….

An amazing family that invited me into their home while I was in Dharavi in Mumbai. I ate food with them and laughed with them. They had a son who I believe suffered from aspergers syndrome however despite this he was not treated in any different way which was inspiring to see in a community where everyday is hard work.

I cant decide between colour and black and white so here are both drop me a comment and let me know which one you like:

For more examples of my documentary work and other work feel free to check out my website:

www.nicholas-adams.co.uk 

Interior Photographs of a property in Notting hill by London based architectural and interior photographer Nicholas Adams

Photographs by London photographer Nicholas Adams 

All images copyright property of Nicholas Adams of www.nicholas-adams.co.uk